Stress, burnout, anxiety and depression in teachers report released

Education Support, alongside Cooper Gibson Research have undertaken a literature review of the impact of stress, burnout, anxiety and depression on teachers.

They found that (p4):

Evidence for the impact of stress,
burnout, anxiety and depression

The evidence suggests that if a teacher experiences stress and/or burnout they are more likely to have: (1) mental and physical ill health; (2) less job satisfaction; and (3) intentions to leave their job and/or the teaching profession.
There is some limited evidence to suggest that if a teacher experiences anxiety they are at increased risk of absenteeism and having intentions of leaving their job and/or the teaching profession.
There is evidence to suggest that teachers with depression are at increased risk of feeling dissatisfied with work, presenteeism and absenteeism.
Some teachers with reduced mental health and wellbeing are at greater risk of experiencing reduced self-efficacy to
carry out their role generally and specifically in relation to classroom management.
Evidence for the impact on learner outcomes
There is some evidence to show an association between teacher stress, burnout, depression and/or anxiety with poorer learner academic achievement, learner engagement (including concentration, satisfaction rates, motivation and
behaviour) but less evidence for learner wellbeing.”

Read the full report below: